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Prairie Creek Seed, in Cascade, is hosting a winter forage tour Wednesday, Jan. 29.

At a time of the year when many folks are foraging for comfort from freezing temperatures and the always-possible prospect of snow, the thought of walking farm fields to learn about different pasture grasses and cover crops may not cause a great deal of excitement.

That’s why Prairie Creek Seed is bringing interested patrons indoors for a winter forage tour, Wednesday, Jan. 29, from 9 a.m. to noon at the company’s office and warehouse at 21995 Fillmore Road.

The staff at Prairie Creek Seed invites interested area residents to join them to learn more about the company’s forage options. The focus will be on perennial grasses, with additional information being presented regarding placement of pasture grasses and blends, alfalfa and grasses for hay production, warm-season forages, cool-season annuals as forages and cover crop options for forage production.

Experts in the field, Prairie Creek Seed began when co-founder Karl Dallefield decided it was time to switch from the seed corn industry to work with pasture grasses and forages. Dallefield traveled extensively throughout the United States and Canada, working with grass-based farms to educate himself on what worked and what didn’t. He began examining individual species of grass and their management in relation to soil health and forage production.

Karl decided he wanted to do business closer to home, and asked his son, Kyle Dallefield, if he wanted to start a seed company.

Kyle had grown up with the family’s sheep and grass-finished cattle production, and the pair began working out of the basement of Karl’s house. With business booming and overflowing the basement, the Dallenfield’s also relied on warehousing at a location in Peosta.

In 2015, the company opened its facility in Cascade as a truly independent seed company.

Prairie Creek Seeds is working throughout the Midwest during the winter months, providing their winter forage tour so farmers and ranchers can continue being successful.